Help to create our Mayan Cultural Conservatory in Yucatán, Mexico

Country

Mexico

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  • last activity

    Last activity

    12/11/2019

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    95.5 %

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    Average reply time:

    within 9 days

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  2019 

 Min stay requested: at least 2 weeks

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  • Description

    Description

    Currently, we are looking for volunteers to help us to develop our Mayan Cultural Conservatory and Language School for offering educational opportunities with hopes of attracting students from all backgrounds, including from nearby schools and from abroad. In addition, the site will also potentially serve as a community center for local community members as well, available for hosting educational “hands-on” workshops to demonstrate the local artisanship and its processes.

  • Type of help

    Type of help

    Gardening
    Building
    Help with Eco project
    Language practice
    Art project

  • UN sustainablity goals this host is trying to achieve

    UN sustainablity goals this host is trying to achieve

    UN goals
    No poverty
    Zero hunger
    Good health and well-being
    Quality education
    Gender equality
    Clean water and sanitation
    Affordable and clean energy
    Decent work and economic growth
    Industries, innovation and infrastructure
    Reduce inequality
    Sustainable cities and communities
    Responsible consumption and production
    Climate action
    Life below water
    Life on land
    Peace, justice and strong institutions
    Partnerships for the goals
  • Cultural exchange and learning opportunities

    Cultural exchange and learning opportunities

    Are you looking for an intensive cross-cultural and second language experience of a lifetime? Come and stay with us in our bilingual village of Chicxulub Pueblo, Yucatan, Mexico. You will certainly have the opportunity to enhance your Spanish skills here or come to dominate your second language, and wholly participate in the culture here as if you belonged; but you will also have the opportunity for a more profound experience. Many residents in our pueblo adhere to the cultural traditions of their ancestors and continue to speak the native Mayan language; and they are highly-receptive to visitors who want to learn to speak with them in their native tongue.

    Under the guidance of the happy “Don Triste”, you will learn more about the regional culture and local environment than you ever thought possible. Triste is a wealth of “Local Environmental Knowledge” with concern to the traditional Mayan world. And because Spanish is also his second language, he is a very empathetic speaker/listener. I know all of this firsthand, because he has facilitated my personal acculturation process.

    Don Triste has helped to open the eyes and mind and body of this university-trained anthropologist and linguist, to an underlying cultural pulse that is difficult to get from any book, to the point that I was moved to write a book about it. (Ironic, no?).

    If you would like to see a bit about what I have learned while living here, and some of what lies ahead for you if you decide to come for a visit, view the digital version of the book at and then clicking on gain Access to the Digital Version with the username Don Hector and password Chicxulub. The book is packed with travel tips for the Yucatan Peninsula, Spanish language review activities for travel, and even an introduction to the spoken Mayan Language of the region.

  • Help

    Help

    Hola Amigos!

    My name is Chris, Mucho gusto! My Mexican wife Doña Laura, my Mayan speaking brother Don Tristeza and I are in the development stage of establishing a Mayan Culture and Language School on our newly acquired property in Chicxulub Pueblo, Yucatan, Mexico.

    While I am originally from the West Coast of the US, I am now living the dream in Chicxulub Pueblo as a credentialed anthropologist and linguist. After nearly ten years here, I have become a participating member of this bilingual language community; speaking both Spanish and Maya in addition to my native English.

    My Mayan-speaking brother, Don Tristeza, sabe mucho de la historia del pueblo, sus habitantes, y muchísimo de la naturaleza por su pueblo de nata. Habla español y yucatec maya como nativo.

    Currently, we are looking for volunteers to help us to develop our Mayan Cultural Conservatory and Language School for offering educational opportunities with hopes of attracting students from all backgrounds, including from nearby schools and from abroad. In addition, the site will also potentially serve as a community center for local community members as well, available for hosting educational “hands-on” workshops to demonstrate the local artisanship and its process.

    We have already preserved the traditional palm-roof roof on the main building, where we cook our meals and hang our hammocks; though there are also two fully-furnished modern rooms for up to four people each just waiting for volunteers to inhabit them. On the other hand, the majority of the property is mostly untouched and is ready for some positive-energy input from some earthy volunteers to help this shared-vision come to life.

    Our immediate plans focus on transforming the land into a cultural experience, with a traditional Mayan garden to support a traditional kitchen, including a corn field for demonstrating the process of nixtamalization from kernel to masa, and then to tortilla and tamal. As well, we are looking to develop some permanent interactive learning exhibitions, with topics to include, but not limited to:

    • Prepare, plant, and maintain a vegetable garden, with a rotation of small corn crop for demonstrating nixtamalization, an ancient and proven process for converting corn into digestible masa.
    • Design, Develop, and Present a Working-Model of one of the following Alternative Energy Sources for use at the Conservatory: A. Compost Biogas System B. Windmill Generators C. Solar Dehydrators.
    • Plant a Garden of fiber-producing plants for demonstrating the process of weaving natural textiles.
    • Research, Design, and Plant a Medicinal and Zest Herb Garden using plants endemic to the Yucatan; with accompanying didactic learning activity for preserving and sharing Mayan Cultural Knowledge.
    • Establish an Traditional Outdoor Kitchen to Demonstrate Traditional Maya Cooking Techniques.
    • Record the location and photograph the remaining Mayan Houses in Chicxulub and nearby villages.
    • Develop and Present a Visual/Interactive Exhibition demonstrating the history and value of the original languages of the Americas, designed for use as a learning tool for the general public.
    • Develop and Present a Two-week Course in Spanish for the General Public, in any of the following subjects: English for Adults; Computer Use for Beginners; Ancient Games for Children; Science for Kids; or any pre-Approved Art Form that can be taught to the General Public.

  • Languages spoken

    Languages spoken

    English, Spanish, Maya

  • Accommodation

    Accommodation

    Our project provides a shared living space experience for volunteers. Accommodations include a personal bed in one of two private rooms on the property, with one room designated for women and the other for men. However, these could be private rooms for groups of two-four participants.

    Besides safe and secure lodging, we also provide food and purified drinking water, including all the local groceries you will need for preparing meals in the communal kitchen

  • What else ...

    What else ...

    This is a peaceful pueblo retreat, away from the hustle-and-bustle of the Capital City and the typical Tourist Areas. Our only house rule concerns the unruly. While everything is fine in moderation, not everyone can handle moderation. Though we do not have a hard rule about the consumption of drugs and alcohol, we do ask that you keep these matters to yourself and away from public view, including the common areas of the posada.

    While the two super-minis in the centro, San Valentín and Mikey Donald’s, which are open all day, from early in the morning until late at night, they mostly only carry packaged foods. To find fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, tortillas, or natural juices, you have to get out early in the day and finish your shopping before noon or 1pm. You can shop in the municipal market, or look for other vendors around the centro such as the fruterías and carnicerías on the main street.

    Finding Prepared Food and Drink around the Pueblo can be a challenge if you go looking for something to eat during the times you regularly eat when you are on vacation. So, you must get accustomed to the current of the pueblo if you do not plan to eat here.

    Wifi is available in all rooms. Internet Speed should hover around 9Mbps. But if there is an internet failure for some reason, you can go to the Cibernautica (Cybercafe) in the Centro which charges by the hour, or visit the Main Plaza in Chicxulub Pueblo for free internet.

    Sheets and towels will be washed for volunteers once a week. For personal clothing, there is a drop-off Wash-and-Fold Laundry in Conkal (5km), which you get to by getting on one of the colectivos taxis for the centro in Chicxulub Pueblo. Or, you can “encargar” a taxista to take your laundry and pick it up for less than $100mxn; $5usd each way, plus the $10mxn/kg of clothes. This usually takes hours. Other options include asking a local woman, but this is not an option on Sunday or rainy days as clothes are line-dried.

  • A little more information

    A little more information

    • Internet access

    • Limited internet access

      Limited internet access

    • We have pets

    • We are smokers

  • How many Workawayers can stay?

    How many Workawayers can stay?

    More than two

  • ...

    Hours expected

    Maximum 4-5 hours a day, 5 days a week





Host ref number: 528931585969