Help on a fruit farm in Minami Alps, Yamanashi Prefecture in Japan

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  • last activity

    Last Activity

    04/12/2016

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2016

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  • Description

    Description

    We are growing various kinds of fruits and doing fruit picking as business.
    Our busy season is mostly from the middle of March until the beginning of October. We need lots of volunteers during the periods but even during our low season, we need some volunteers as well.
    For your meals, basically you don't have to cook and my sister in law, Yoko-san will cook VERY tasty Japanese for your breakfast and dinner every day. For your lunch, we usually eat on the farm or at helpers' house.

    Kazu

  • Type of help

    Type of help

    Farming

  • Help

    Help

    *The calendar below shows our farming work
      and roughly what we do in a year.


    Season work Purpose of work
    January -February Pruning branches of apple tree
    January -February Pruning, trimming and cutting branches
    January -February collecting branches
    February peeling the bark of grape vines & apple trees
    Mid & late March Thinning out buds of peaches
    70-80% of peach buds will be taken away.
    Before they turn to be flowers,we thin
    out about 70-80% of the buds of the peaches, in order to produce big and
    tasty peaches.

    Mid & late March Pruning branches of cherry trees
    Mid & late March planting new trees
    Mid & late March peeling the bark of grape vines & apple trees
    April pollinating various kinds of fruit trees
    such as plums, peaches, pears, cherries
    and apples.
    We use bees to help fertilize seeds,
    especially for cherries.
    Yet, here in Japan, we people do
    pollination works manually besides our
    use of the bees.

    April thinning out peach flowers.
    half of the flowers will be thinned out.
    After pollination works, we do thinning
    flowers.

    April thinning out apple flowers
    May thinning out apples when they are still very
    small in order to produce bigger and tastier
    apples
    May thinning out peaches when they are still very
    small.
    Half of peaches will be thinned out when they
    are still small.
    in order to produce bigger and tastier
    peaches
    May thinning out plums when they are still very
    small in order to produce bigger and tastier
    plums
    May mowing & weeding with machines or tools not to let weeds absorb fertilized nurishments under the soil, especially
    around each tree
    May watering
    May putting the signs advertising our frui picking
    on the main streets
    June We place a pair of two sheets of paper
    around each fruit when they
    reach proper size. We do that mostly for
    peaches, pears, nectarines, apples and
    bunches of grapes In order to protect our crops from bugs,
    damage by strong winds or tyhoons.
    Furthermore, we can give our fruit a lot
    more color if we keep inside this specially
    made paper for a few months.
    June thinning out grapes in order to produce bigger and tastier
    grapes
    June watering
    June harvest of cherries
    June cherry picking
    June mowing & weeding with machines or tools
    June harvest of plums and peaches
    July tearing off paper covering the fruit Removing the paper exposes the fruit is the
    sun to give it more color.
    July spreading special nylon paper called "multi "
    and putting it on the ground under each peach tree to give the fruit more color With this method, we can increase the
    fruit's exposure to the sun and improve the
    colour.

    July pruning useless shoots and branches of each
    peach tree In order to give crops more nutrition while
    giving them sunshine, we try to keep some
    space between the branches. This work
    about a week before harvest comes.
    July harvest of peaches and plums
    July putting steel supports under the branches of
    each tree of peaches and plums Before harvest comes, the fruit tends to
    swell quickly.
    We need to put steel support under the
    branches so that they don't break under
    the weight of the fruit.
    July mowing and weeding
    July watering
    July covering the gape vines with nets to protect them from birds, especially
    crows
    July harvest of peaches
    July harvest of plums
    July peach & plums' picking
    August prunning useless shoots and branches of each
    peach tree
    harvesting peaches and plums In order give crops more nutrition while
    giving them sunshine, we try to keep some
    space between the branches. This work
    comes about a week before harvest
    August putting steel support under the apples'
    branches to prevent them breaking.
    August mowing and weeding
    August harvest of grapes and plums
    August grape picking
    plum picking
    peach picking
    August watering
    September taking "multis"out of the ground
    September taking steel support out of the peach and plum
    trees
    September spreading special nylon paper called "multi "
    on the ground under each apple tree to expose
    the fruit to more sunshine and to give fruit
    more colour.
    September putting out the signs of our apple picking
    business on the main streets
    September tearing off paper covering apples to expose them to the sun For Yoko, Oorin
    and Shin-sekai varieties.
    September covering apple orchard s with nets to protect them out of wild birds
    September spreading manure
    September mowing & weeding
    September harvest of grapes
    grape picking
    September harvest of pears
    pear picking
    September watering
    October tearing off papers covering apples to give them
    color out of sunshine For the variety of Fuji apples
    October spreading special nylon paper called "multi "and
    putting on the ground under each apple tree to
    give more color to the fruit.
    October harvest of apples
    apple picking
    October harvest of grapes
    grape picking
    October mowing & weeding
    November harvest of apples
    apple picking
    December harvest of apples
    apple picking
    December taking steel supports out of the peach and plum
    trees
    December taking "multis"out of the ground
    December taking nets out of the apple orchards
    December Pruning branches of fruit trees
    December collecting branches and shoots of fruit trees
    after trimming works in the orchards
    December putting dry straw around each cherry tree to protect trees from freezing
    December taking the apple picking signs down
    December to January pruning & trimming branches and extra shoots
    December to January spreading manure

  • Languages spoken

    Languages spoken

    Japanese and English

  • Accommodation

    Accommodation

    We have several houses. I bought one of them for volunteers two years ago. It was just a old storage house originally but I hired lots of professional carpenters, glazier man, painter, electric man and let them remodel the house to be a mini-dorm and installed two shower rooms, mini-kitchen, two toilets, a washroom, two washing machines, a fredge, a microwave, an airconditioner. We have four bed rooms downstairs and in each room, I bought a bunkbed so,that means eight people can stay on the first floor and besides that, we have two more Japanese tatami rooms upstairs where mostly lasies stay. I bought and installed lots of other furnitures also. I prepared 15 bikes for volunteers. So, to commute between volunteers’
    house and ourfarms, you can take one of them. This is one of the best accommodations for volunteers, I believe. The location is VERY nice. It is located on the field area, surrounded by lots of high mountains including
    Mt. Fuji, Yatsugatake Range, South Alps of Japan. In front of this house, we have a canalcalled “Tokushima Canal” along the avenue of Sakura trees

    (cherry blossom trees) and it goes on for 40 kilometers long. Tokushima Canal was created during 1600s. It is one of the historical monuments in this local area. Mr. Tokushima, the guy from Tokugawa government came over
    to rescue local farmers and they all worked hard to create this canal

    for bringing enough water to grow rice in this region.

  • What else ...

    What else ...

    (For your use of internet)
    For your use of internet, at Obasan's house where I stay, I installed wifi,
    so you can bring your smart phone or laptop to use internet before
    or after your dinner and even before breakfast, you might be able to use.
    On your day off, you can visit our local library where there are two PCs
    to use for internet. That is a very tiny library but located within walking distance. There are actually two more spots where you can use internet.

  • A little more information

    A little more information

    • Internet access

    • Limited internet access

      Limited internet access

    • We have pets

    • We are smokers

  • How many Workawayers can stay?

    How many Workawayers can stay?

    More than two

  • ...

    Volunteering hours expected

    Maximum 4-5 hours a day, 5 days a week


Host ref number: 421281639674

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